West Umatilla Mosquito Control District
MOSQUITO EGG RAFT

mosquito laying eggsMany mosquitoes, such as Culex pipiens, lay their eggs on the surface of fresh or stagnant water. The water may be in tin cans, barrels, horse troughs, ornamental ponds, swimming pools, puddles, creeks, ditches, catch basins or marshy areas. Mosquitoes prefer water sheltered from the wind by grass and weeds.

Culex mosquitoes usually lay their eggs at night over a period of time sticking them together to form a raft of from 100 to 300 eggs. A raft of eggs looks like a speck of soot floating on the water and is about 1/4 inch long and 1/8 inch wide. A female mosquito may lay a raft of eggs every third night during its life span.

mosquito egg raftAnopheles and many other mosquitoes lay their eggs singly on the water surface. Aedes and Ochlerotatus mosquitoes lay their eggs singly, usually on damp soil. Aedes and Ochlerotatus eggs are more resistant to drying out (some require complete drying out before the eggs will hatch) and hatch only when flooded with water (salt water high tides, irrigated pastures, treeholes flooded by rains, flooded stream bottoms). Anopheles, Culex and Mansonia eggs are susceptible to long periods of drying out. Tiny mosquito larvae (1st instar) emerge from the eggs within 24 - 48 hours almost in unison.

mosquito egg rafts


West Umatilla Mosquito Control District

Dedicated to the Protection of Public Health Through the Reduction of Public Health Vectors